Council for Psychoanalysis and Jungian Analysis

The CPJA is a College of the UK Council for Psychotherapy. It has an individual membership of over 1800 practitioners and brings together 30 Organisational Members, most of which offer training courses. It is the largest organisation of psychodynamic, psychoanalytic and Jungian psychotherapists in the UK.

What kind of psychotherapy do CPJA members offer?

All members of the CPJA believe that unconscious processes shape our behaviour and our lives. Broadly speaking this means that we don’t know as much about ourselves as we think we do.

The unconscious is, as the word suggests, ‘un’-conscious but manifests in dreams, symptoms and patterns of behaviour. Often we know these patterns are damaging to our selves and others, but we feel powerless to change them. More positively, the unconscious is also a source of creativity and imagination.

Members of the CPJA work with people with a very wide range of concerns, such as depression, anxiety, sexual and relationship problems, conflicts at work or in education, and loss of a sense of meaning and purpose in life. However, it is not necessary to have a specific problem but simply desire to undertake a journey of discovery. Read more here.

Are you looking for a psychotherapist?

Our members work with children, adolescents, adults and older people, with people with disabilities, with couples, groups, and families. If you are looking for a psychotherapist, please use our find a therapist page.

CPJA members: for latest news, scroll down …

CALL FOR A NEW BJP BOOK REVIEWS EDITOR

Judith Warren, the Journal’s Book Reviews Editor, will be retiring at the end of September 2017. For more information about the role and the application process, please contact Hannah Wakley, BJP Editorial Administrator, bjpsychotherapyadmin@wiley.com

We hope to appoint Judith’s replacement by late Spring.  Closing date for applications: 15 April 2017

If you wish to have an informal conversation about the work, please contact Judith directly n jw@judithwarren.co.uk

Dates of CPJA College meetings and events in 2017

8 July 2017:  CPJA College meeting

12.00 to 16.00 at Greenside Community Centre, 24 Lilestone Street, Lisson Grove, London NW8 8SR

………

14 October 2017:  CPJA Conference and AGM

10.00 – 16.00 Greenside Community Centre, 24 Lilestone Street, Lisson Grove, London NW8 8SR

BAPPS Spring Conference 25 March 2017 in London

Supervision across the Boundary: negotiating the challenges of dynamic administration in our supervisory work         

MARGARET SMITH

The setting of boundaries in group supervision is essential to providing supervisees with the sense of containment needed to allow therapists to reflect on and develop their practice.  Challenges to the boundaries of supervision are often unexpected, such as when a supervisee gets in touch because of a crisis in their work, or because of sudden illness.  Sometimes supervisees are based in a different physical location, and supervision will need to be conducted via another type of communication, which may present its very own boundary issues.  This workshop will be an opportunity to reflect on the, often complex, challenges supervisors face in their work.

Cost including hot lunch and refreshments BAPPS Members: £76 / Early Bird £60 / Retired £45

Non-Members: £88 / Early Bird £78            Early Bird bookings deadline: Friday February 13th

Full details and how to book are available here or enquiries to admin@supervision.org.uk

2017 CAP FILM SERIES   ‘NATIONHOOD, IDENTITY AND THE OTHER’

THE 2017 CAP FILM SERIES   ‘NATIONHOOD, IDENTITY AND THE OTHER’
The next film of the season will be shown on 19 March 2017.
‘Bloody Sunday’ (Greengrass) 
Full details are on available here
The film will be shown from 10.30am at the JW3, 341-351 Finchley Road, London NW3 6ET
Christopher Hauke and colleagues will present.

” Psychic Change in Psychoanalysis ” BPA s Conference 20 th May 2017

20 May 2017

This first conference of the British Psychoanalytic Association (BPA)
will take place at the Royal College of Physicians,
11 St Andrews Place, London NW1 4LE.

Clinical Groups will be held on the evening of 
Friday 19 May at 37 Mapesbury Road, London, NW2 3RN. 
A Reception takes place after the Clinical Groups for attendees of Groups and those solely attending the Conference the next day.

BOOKING NOW OPEN

Please complete your details on the booking form

Conference aim

The aim of this first conference of the British Psychoanalytic Association (BPA) is to revisit a topic that lies at the heart of psychoanalysis: psychic change, with a focus on what it means and how it happens. The speakers and panelists will approach the subject from the varying theoretical perspectives of British psychoanalysis, providing the vital opportunity to explore differences and common ground. Ample time is given for discussion between speakers, panelists, and the audience, in the hope of generating lively and creative exploration, explication, and debate.

 

Keynote speakers:

Dr Ronald Britton, Training and Supervising Analyst and Distinguished Fellow British Psychoanalytical Society (BPAS) and Honorary Fellow BPA

Mrs Sara Collins, Training and Supervising Analyst BPA

Ms Viqui Rosenberg, Training and Supervising Analyst BPA.

CPJA’s Annual Activity Plan and Budget for 2016 17

Details of CPJA’s Activity Plan for 2016/17 are available here http://www.cpja.org.uk/cpja-activity-plan-2016-17/

and the College Budget for 2016/17 are at http://www.cpja.org.uk/cpja-budget-2016-17/

Additional Notes For CPJA Action Plan from Andy Cottom

Additional notes re CPJA action plan:

Item 1. We have 5 Quinquennial Reviews planned for the year.

In recognition of the considerable amount of work involved in QRs we have again raised the payment for the visitors, the writing of the reports and for the appraisal of the ethical documents to as follows:

Convenor: £350.00; Second visitor: £250.00; Report writer: £225.00; Ethics documents appraisal: £250.00

Item 2: We are planning on carrying out the reaccreditation of between 40 and 50 Direct Registrants. (The exact number depends the renewal of membership later in 2016 and the survival of some struggling OMs). The cost of the work involved was carefully calculated bappraising the amount of work undertaken in the first year. We have kept the cost to the registrant the same as in the last 2 years. The work is intended to fully accounted for by this payment so it may need adjusting in future years. This would need to fit in with the cost of membership through OMs. This year we are trying to synchronise the reaccreditation of Direct Members so as not to clash with the work the committee needs to undertake OM QRs.

Item 3:  Regular ongoing meetings of the Training Standards and Members Committee (TS&MC) and their Reaccreditation of Direct Registrants Subcommittee (RDRS) held the same day Executive Committee, College and Ethics Committee meetings so the cost of venue and members travel expenses amortised with these. 4 meetings are planned each year, one of which to be held outside London.

Item 4: The amount of voluntary work required in the continued regulation to the standards that we (UKCP) value and promote has been increasing on an annual basis. Although the work of the QR visitors and Direct Membership peer assessors is now compensated, the considerable amount of work spent by key members of the Executive Committee is unpaid and unlikely to be sustainable without some compensation. We propose that this work needs to be analysed by logging it and paying for it on an hourly rate. We propose that the Chair of TS&MC (also Chair of th foe RDRS ) receives an honorarium of £1,000.00 in recognition of the responsibility of the role(s). Similarly the Chair of the Ethics Committee should receive the same amount. In addition we are asking for a payment of £40.00 per hour (capped at a sum of £2,000) for work done on regulation in the College.

Item 5: Our Annual Conference and AGM are to be held on the same date with the AGM at the end of day. This was originally planned for April 2016 but needed to be postponed due to clashes when the date of the Board of Trustee away day needed to be changed. This will need to be balanced with our budget from last year. As with the Ethics Symposium (Item7), tickets will be sold for the Annual Conference and the income is budgeted to offset all of the costs. The Annual Conference is open to members of other colleges and to BPC members. The AGM is for CPJA members only.

Item 6: Regular meetings with the Chairs of Ethics Committees of each of our OMs proved popular initially but the frequency may needs to be reduced.

Item 7: An Ethics Symposium (or conference) has been occasionally held in previous years and have been well attended enough to encourage repeating them. We are currently considering whether to open it to other colleges or organisations (BPC).

Item 8: The Finance Committee was established after the College QR. It currently consists of the College Chair, the Treasurer and the Administrator. However we are discontinuing the role of Treasurer (and Honorary Secretary see item 11 as from the AGM (15th October). Keith Armitage will be staying on the Executive Committee and will continue to work on the Finance Committee. The honorarium for Treasurer will no longer be necessary.

Item 9:  The Executive Committee have a teleconference two weeks before face to face meetings to allow members time to prepare reports and to optimise the time spent face to face. We have found that additional teleconferences for TS&MC, RDRS, Finance and Executive have been required in addition.

Item 10: The Executive Committee have held an Away Day for the past 3 years which has proved invaluable in coming up with new ideas, prioritising our goals, our position within UKCP and the outside world.

Item 11: In recognition that administrative work is more effectively carried out by professional administrators rather than psychotherapists we are discontinuing the role of Honorary Secretary and the administrator will be taking on additional responsibilities. The administrator will be responsible for:  

  • Minute taking and write up of all meetings and teleconferences
  • Assisting finance committee with preparation of annual action plan and budget
  • Assisting in organisation of Annual Conference, Away Day and Ethics Symposium
  • Administration of Direct Member reaccreditation
  • Communications between College, OMs and Individual Members
  • Responding to email correspondence
  • Synchronisation of College and OM events in keeping with UKCP calendar
  • Receipt and payment of invoices and additional book keeping/ accounting (possibility of handing this over to UKCP at some stage)
  • Support for the Chair and other members of the Executive Committee.

The honorarium for Honorary Secretary will no longer be necessary.

Item 12: The CPJA website has proved valuable this year in the dissemination of information (especially in the reaccreditation of Direct Registrants) and synchronisation of events. However it is very time consuming for volunteer members. Rhoda Dorndorf has spent a huge number of hours on this as has the College Chair (and the Administrator). As with most of the work undertaken by volunteers, this is unlogged. We propose that this work is paid for at a rate of £25.00 per hour (1/2 the hourly rate charged by the website designer) but logged and accounted for. We believe that this could be a very large so propose that the work is capped at 40 hours i.e. £1,000.00 for the year.

Item 13: The Annual Conference has required setting out a theme, suggesting and liaising appropriate speakers, writing a call for papers and promotional material for the event. Working with the College Chair and the administrator (who organises venues, catering, ticketing and accounting) Rhoda Dorndorf has again spent considerable hours on this. The Ethics Symposium will also require this type of work and we are also considering inviting more external speakers to our College meetings.  (to be budgeted in mid- year review).

We have budgeted a payment of £1,000.00 for this work but with hopes that ticket sales for the 2 events will refund at least part of this.

The Site for Contemporary Psychoanalysis: Clinical Workshops 2017

The SITE for Contemporary Psychoanlysis Clinical Workshops

8th April 2017 Working with psychosis Dorothée Bonnigal-Katz
6th May 2017 Psychoanalysis & class Barry Watt
10th June 2017  Working with drug & alcohol addiction Eric Harper
8 July 2017 Working with Couples – Haya Oakley
Time 2-5pm
Venue October Gallery 24 Old Gloucester Street Bloomsbury London WC1N 3AL
Cost £50.00 per workshop £40.00 each if you book 3 or more workshops
For more info, visit www.the-site.org.uk To book, email siteenquiries2015@gmail.com

DISCUSSION PAPER ( 2 ) PRESENTED TO THE CPJA ON NOVEMBER 28TH by ALAN LIDMILA ( EXECUTIVE MEMBER OF THE CPJA AND MEMBER OF THE HALLAM INSTITUTE OF PSYCHOTHERAPY )

CPJA Discussion Statement: Parameters of Practice/2

We need to address the question ‘what is it we do?’ (and what is it we try not to do). Because it may be unclear, and therefore requires redefinition. This short paper seeks to delineate core principles of psychoanalytic practice, based in a reliable theoretical model that has evolved over time.
Essentially, it is a concrete restatement of our ‘flag statement’ (revised 2012) that in simple but meaningful terms may be listed as a series of principles of practice as follows:
• Rhythm (translation: key arrangements around time, frequency, and regularity, typically longer than shorter, based in an understanding concerning, among other factors, infant development);
• Regression (trans: also concerning time and the importance of early or past experience ,including as re-experienced, possibly re-enacted, in the therapy setting);
• The Unconscious (trans: mental operations , perhaps determining behaviour, not immediately apparent, the meaning of which may be accessed through language, dream and symbol);
• Setting/Frame (trans: the therapeutic space, involving the above, as well as, crucially, attention to boundary and abstinence, as far as possible intellectually, and certainly physically);
• Language and Thought ( trans: the epistemophiliac impulse, aka the desire to know – and fear knowing – as investigated, facilitated and understood , quintessentially, via language and speech);
• Interpersonal Relationship ( trans: the inter-subjective relationship/s between therapist and client, often involving multiple objects of a transferential and countertransferential nature, that may come to be identified and recognised by means of insight and interpretation);
• Supervision ( trans: therapist normally has recourse to the ‘3rd position’ of supervision, wherein there is located some authority of the model, in addition to managing this position internally).

It therefore follows, as distinguishing features of p-a practice, that normally or typically, we do not advise, and try to be judicious in our use of creativity. We are also cautious about, if not actually prohibit, forms of acting-in, which may include touch, extra-sessional contact, or excessive dosages of expertise, sermonising or prescriptions. We may utilise short-term dynamic approaches, but we do not consciously adapt our approach by wandering into territories best occupied by other modalities. We try not to succumb to pressures for a ‘quick-fix’, or be seduced by the fantastic, whether ‘new idea’ or latest toy.
This statement is really a reprise, in edited form, of my thinking of twenty years ago,* which was what many jobbing analytic therapists thought anyway, and what most should be thinking now! Some things do not need to change, for the sake of change. Notwithstanding my claimed adherence to the above rubric, over 25years I have become, subject to client or pathology, relatively more flexible, responsive and creative in my personal style. But, I suggest, it is within, not beyond the pale

DISCUSSION PAPER (1) PRESENTED TO THE CPJA ON NOVEMBER 28TH by ALAN LIDMILA ( Executive Committee Member of CPJA and member of The Hallam Institute of Psychotherapy )

Paradigms of Practice/1

CPJA 1

By way of introduction, let me tell you a short tale. Twenty-five years ago today, a few of us were trying to get all the band to play.. So, in this actual venue, a meeting was held, probably long forgotten, with the title: ‘The Making of Analytic Psychotherapy – Varying Perspectives’. H.W (a fellow-conspirator at the time)and I were invited to contribute and my offering was entitled :’ The Emperors Clothes – looking again at analytic paradigms’ At the time, we barbarians spoke for the fringe, unsanctified analytic tribes, those unblessed by metropolitan hegemonic holy waters.
There has always been a debate as to what properly constitutes psychoanalytic practice. In alliance with elements of The Guild, AGIP & other ‘liberal’ organisations, we were trying to widen, indeed diversify the range of organised p-a practice in what were pre-UKCP days, in a field that was very exclusively organised in ritual, incestuous obeisance around The Institute. Hence the sub-title on that day. It is a longer tale, but one not only for the archive: history, like food, repeats.

Now, looking for an apposite phrase in very different times I consider plus ca change , plus c’est la meme chose but, things are not quite the same, even if the comment underscores what is often ironic about apparently progressive change, and signifies the importance of history, taking a ‘ long view’ regarding a current zeitgeist, or any uncritical conformity to the flavour of the day..
At that time, as now, sub-texts,politics, are at play. Then, the ‘radical’ tendency was to widen the net, extend the brief, allow in some of the Barbarians from the outer encampments (not a wholly altruistic move, as this would in turn strengthen a power base, assist economic imperatives, in squabbling London town houses).Yet change is ironic, and dialectic, and often unintended; my comments today suggest other consequences in psychotherapy culture ,and in turn a response that is now, necessarily, more ‘tradical’ than radical !

To briefly explain this shift. Now, we inhabit, in wider culture as it impinges on psychotherapy culture, different, but not necessarily progressively better times. Leaving aside the problematic ‘regulatory mind’, we almost over-subscribe to values of ‘inclusivity and diversity’, which may have undesirable consequences as far as a homogenous, clearly differentiated psychoanalytic model is concerned. Ironically, the old guard, zealous keepers of the flame, upped sticks to form a higher temple elsewhere, leaving a vacuum, fertile for doubters, to ‘develop’, deconstruct, or maybe dismantle the integrity of the model – a model already under external threat in Nice Times. (I note tendencies, by the way, not conspiracies!).

The confidence in the model seems to have wavered for some, who as a result, have experimented, with techniques, derived from other models. This is not necessarily ‘adapt and survive’, any more than any crisis is nuclear – it is more like anxiety, or at worst panic. There are two interacting factors:
Adaptive responses to external pressures in form of NICE, IAPT, contractions in NHS and trainings, coincident with a translation of the ideology of diversity into shifts in practice technique, so as to resemble a more mixed portfolio, some more strings to the practitioner bow, because, well, we need to reflect and embrace diversity, rather than anything that whiffs of exclusiveness, elitism, even specialism. I am suggesting there is evidence of muddled, if well-meaning thinking, which has contributed to doing a disservice to a confidently held psychoanalytic paradigm. Thanks.

Men are at increased risk of suicide & need to know it’s okay to talk. YOU TUBE clip . Watch with care

https://youtu.be/4goZswg_8L8Published on Sep 10, 2014 A ” MIND ” PUBLICATION

*Please take care if you decide to watch this video, it necessarily contains discussion of suicidal feelings.*

Men are at particular risk of suicide. In this video Lee, Rohan and Graham talk about the specific difficulties around being a man and feeling suicidal.

You can watch a video about suicide generally here http://youtu.be/yjPlTuhpgjg

Transcript:
It’s so difficult to talk about if you haven’t got the right people to talk to about it. I come from … Well, it’s a working class background. My granddad worked in the pits. My dad started as an electrical engineer. I’ve been brought up that we don’t express emotion, because of I’ve never told anyone that I’ve had suicidal thoughts. I’ve told them recently, but for a long long time, as a man, you just don’t.

I grew up playing high level of sport, both within school and … level. So again, I was exposed to that quite unforgiving environment of a sports dressing room. You multiply that, as well, with a room full of adolescents young males. It just wasn’t a place where you expressed or admitted any type of weakness. So what I did, I started internalizing, hiding everything. And then you just showed up, you smiled, and you just got on with it.

You develop this facade, don’t you?

Yeah, and I think it’s a bit of a West-Indian thing as well. It’s; these things stay between four walls. So I just got used to, again, that whole internalizing. You don’t talk about this to the outside world. This is something we deal with … For want of a business way putting it, we deal with this in-house.

There are instances absolutely where males
will have a set of challenges and they’ll be ashamed to open up, and they’ll be ashamed to open up in… They are the crutch to the family, they will take on themselves to be the crouch of the family, the bread-winner, the support, the main man in the house.

And I think it brings its own pressures. I come from a family, a mother and a father, who divorced when I was 4, both with their own mental health issues. My dad was quite open and honest about so he would say, “I’m going to kill myself. I wish I had the balls to kill myself.” While my mom was just completely this nervous wreck of … Kind of kept in, restricted, kind of frailty that she had, that kind of lived over in her head.

How does that affect you as a young guy, like 6-7 years old, when you hear your dad saying, “I want to kill myself.” I can’t begin to imagine.

It just seems, at the time, it was just normal, it was the way life was. And over the years you can kind of become a default person of what you experience as a child, and that becomes you. It really didn’t take much by the time I got to my mid-twenties, to kind of set me off on my own issues. Because it was normal for that to happen.

I got to the stage where I almost went the other way. I take responsibility for everything. I refuse to put blame on even things which actually have had a very big impact on your life. So I always felt, if you turn around and say that your mental illness is because of your parents’ divorce, you’re saying that none of it is your fault and it’s all your parents’ fault. But, again, when I started seeing a counselor and began to unpack everything, he said, “Look, just look at it in plain obvious facts.” It started unraveling for you, the depression kicked in at that time.

A long time ago.

Stop being so hard on yourself and actually understand …

That sounds … I think we can all …

It’s a case of not being hard on yourself. It is exactly that. When my consultant pointed out key events and said, “The key events are your manic triggers, Lee,” I put them together. It sits in the timeline. I couldn’t have this conversation with my mates in the pub. I couldn’t do it. Because you can’t say to him, “How you feeling? We had a good day.”

I must have, I’m not the normal. I just happened to have a few powers I could do. But listen I can totally relate to that. It’s more by coincidence or anything else.

I can do now, but back then …

The big reason why a lot of my mates can talk to me now is because I opened with them first. It’s about making the first move. I needed to talk to people. You probably do find that the more you talk to people, the more you get it back.

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A century on, Freud’s melancholia remains the psychological condition of the lost soul. Which is why psychoanalysis has become the modern form of exorcism

” I believe in ghosts. I live with them all the time. But it wasn’t always the case. Foolishly, I used to pretend they didn’t exist, that the dead stayed dead, that they had no purchase on my life. But now I speak to them all the time and they speak to me. I have photographs of them on my study wall. And I have even come to love them, in a strange kind of way. But I don’t call them ghosts. I call them memories, many half buried, many faintly conceived. For one of the surprising things unearthed for me by the extraordinary chemistry of psychoanalysis was the continuing presence of my ancestors. Ghosts are psychological unfinished business, often associated with unprocessed pain.

It is exactly a hundred years since Sigmund Freud set pen to paper to write his ground breaking paper Mourning and Melancholia. Published in 1917, Freud distinguished between two responses to loss: mourning, when the object of loss is clear and obvious, and thus can be emotionally processed; and melancholia, a state of being in which one is affected by a loss that one is unable to name. Melancholia is, as it were, a loss that one doesn’t realise has been lost. And because one cannot properly name this loss, because it exists in the psychic shadows, one cannot go through the process of mourning it properly. The pain goes unburied. So it hangs around and continually haunts you. This state of melancholia is often associated with depression.

It was four years ago last Monday that I resigned from St Paul’s Cathedral. Dealing with the emotional fallout led me back to therapy. Initially, I thought the subsequent depression was to do with something obvious like a loss of ego-status or a life-crisis that had yet to be properly worked through. But as the lens widened, something unexpected came into view. My ancestors came to these shores escaping persecution. Many were central European refugees fleeing tsarist pogroms. And as Jews were being gassed in Nazi Germany, my family were desperately seeking to re-build their lives, searching for normality and acceptance. And for some, the best way to do this was to forget the past and to blend in. My dad became a Christian. I became a priest. Unconsciously, it was the ultimate way not to talk about what had happened. But theologically, it was the ultimate betrayal  not to talk about what had happened. And yet, for me, the dead refused to stay dead. The Jewish talking cure, also invented by a man running away from his religion, returned to me these buried presences and invited me to walk among them again: my great-grandfather Louis, working for the Jewish Board of Guardians looking after “swarms” (cf David Cameron) of desperate refugees in the East End; his brother Samuel, with his Anglican-looking dog-collar, but leading the Princes Road synagogue in Liverpool.

And yet, for me, the dead refused to stay dead. The Jewish talking cure, also invented by a man running away from his religion, returned to me these buried presences and invited me to walk among them again: my great-grandfather Louis, working for the Jewish Board of Guardians looking after “swarms” (cf David Cameron) of desperate refugees in the East End; his brother Samuel, with his Anglican-looking dog-collar, but leading the Princes Road synagogue in Liverpool. They both changed their names from Friedeberg. And, interestingly, they were both of Freud’s generation.  For me, only by re-membering the dead would melancholia be converted into plain old mourning. My healing was to be found among the ghosts.

The year before Freud was writing Mourning and Melancholia, the fascinating ethnographer Shlomo Ansky was writing his own Jewish ghost story called The Dybbuk and subtitled “between two worlds”. In Jewish mythology, the dybbuk is a dark lost soul, suspended in some intermediate state between life and death. For a secular socialist like Ansky, his story was an expression of mourning for a religious culture that was collapsing both around him and inside him. The Jewish faith was something he rejected and yet needed at the same time. “My life was broken, split, torn,” as he put it. Freud invented psychoanalysis and Ansky wrote about ghosts. But they were doing a similar thing: resurrecting the half-dead, thus to give them a proper burial. Freud’s melancholia is the psychological condition of the dybbuk, the lost soul. And psychoanalysis is a form of exorcism. So, yes, I believe in ghosts. My sanity depends upon it. Happy Halloween. ” Giles Fraser